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Nano-Eugenics: Bill Gates New Advocacy.

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Eugenics advocate, Bill Gates is at it again, throwing money at any researcher with a claim to fame and everything to gain by using scientific advances to prevent as many babies as possible from being born. Soft kill drugs in the pretext of protection is the common theme for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Cheap, effective contraceptive and HIV pharmaceuticals are now the objectives soon to target the third world.

A University of Washington team has developed a platform they say simultaneously offers contraception and prevents HIV. Electrically spun cloth with nanometer-sized fibers can dissolve to release drugs, providing a platform for cheap medical use. The research was published this week in the Public Library of Science’s open-access journal PLoS One. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation last month awarded the UW researchers almost $1 million to pursue the technology.

“Our dream is to create a product women can use to protect themselves from HIV infection and unintended pregnancy,” said corresponding author Kim Woodrow, a UW assistant professor of bioengineering. “We have the drugs to do that. It’s really about delivering them in a way that makes them more potent, and allows a woman to want to use it.”

billy on killingThe Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has committed 10 billion dollars over the next ten years to make it the most aggressive decade ever to roll out new vaccines to poor nations around the world. The commitment will also effectively create widespread fertility problems across vaccinated populations.

Bill Gates told a recent TED conference, an organization which is sponsored by one of the largest toxic waste polluters on the planet, that vaccines need to be used to reduce world population figures in order to solve global warming and lower CO2 emissions.

Electrospinning

Electrospinning uses an electric field to catapult a charged fluid jet through air to create very fine, nanometer-scale fibers. The fibers can be manipulated to control the material’s solubility, strength and even geometry. Fibers may be even better at delivering medicine than existing technologies such as gels, tablets or pills.

At a lab meeting last year, Woodrow presented the concept, and co-authors Emily Krogstad and Cameron Ball, both first-year graduate students, pursued the idea.

Electrospinning_Diagram

Diagram Showing Fibre Formation by Electrospinning

They first dissolved polymers approved by the Food and Drug Administration and antiretroviral drugs used to treat HIV to create a gooey solution that passes through a syringe. As the stream encounters the electric field it stretches to create thin fibers measuring 100 to several thousand nanometers that whip through the air and eventually stick to a collecting plate (one nanometer is about one 25-millionth of an inch). The final material is a stretchy fabric that can physically block sperm or release chemical contraceptives and antivirals.

“This method allows controlled release of multiple compounds,” Ball said. “We were able to tune the fibers to have different release properties.”

Nano-microchips invisible to the naked eye are a reality that are already being hosted in wide-range of applications.

No high temperatures are involved, so the method is suitable for heat-sensitive molecules. The fabric can also incorporate large molecules, such as proteins and antibodies, that are hard to deliver through other methods.

The final material is a stretchy fabric. “This method allows controlled release of multiple compounds,” said coauthor Cameron Ball. “We were able to tune the fibers to have different release properties.”

fibers-and-sperm

The electrospun fibers can release chemicals or they can physically block sperm, as shown here

One of the fabrics they made dissolves within minutes, potentially offering users immediate, discrete protection against unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.

Another dissolves gradually over a few days, providing an option for sustained delivery, more like the birth-control pill,  to provide contraception and guard against HIV.

The fabric could incorporate many fibers to include more than one anti-HIV drug. Mixed fibers could be designed to release drugs at different times to increase their potency, like the prime-boost method used in vaccines.

The electrospun cloth could be inserted directly in the body or be used as a coating on vaginal rings or other products.

This is the first study to use nanofibers for vaginal drug delivery. Critics claim that no long-term studies have been established to assess safety which could pose serious health implications to third world countries where the cloths are targeted for use.

Further research is needed into the risks associated with the growing field of nanotechnology manufacture. A vast and rapidly expanding array of engineered nano-products are flooding the consumer market unregulated as evidence of toxicities accumulate.

Electrospinning has existed for decades, but it’s only recently been automated to make it practical for applications such as filtration and tissue engineering. This is the first study to use nanofibers for vaginal drug delivery.

While this technology is more discrete than a condom, and potentially more versatile than pills or plastic or rubber devices, researchers say there is no single right answer.

“At the time of sex, are people going to actually use it? That’s where having multiple options really comes into play,” Krogstad said. “Depending on cultural background and personal preferences, certain populations may differ in terms of what form of technology makes the most sense for them.”

gates africaThe team is focusing on places like Africa where HIV is most common, but the technology could be used in the U.S. or other countries to offer birth control while also preventing one or more sexually transmitted diseases.

The team will use the new Gates Foundation grant to evaluate the versatility and feasibility of their system. The group will hire more research staff and buy an electrospinning machine to make butcher-paper sized sheets. The expanded team will then spend a year testing combinations that deliver two antiretroviral drugs and a hormonal contraceptive, and then six months scaling up production of the most promising materials.

No long-term studies have been planned before officially releasing the new drug technology to the public.

Diseases Associated with Nanoparticles

Nanoparticles may be inhaled, ingested or taken in through contact with the skin. The known possible adverse health impacts include both natural and anthropogenic nanoparticles. Obviously not all nanoparticles are harmful, but without exhaustive tests especially in the case of the newly engineered nanoparticles, it is impossible to tell.

Once nanoparticles enter the food chain are organisms able to excrete them or do they remain and accumulate inside the organism – and if they do, how do they behave? Do they affect natural processes and do they pose a threat? Can nanoparticles pass through biological barriers such as skin, mucous membranes or cell membranes to inadvertently enter our bodies? Currently these questions have no definitive answer. But that hasn’t stopped a great deal of money being spent developing nanotechnology, while comparatively little is being put into its potential consequences.

nanotechnologyDiseases associated with inhaled nanoparticles include asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, lung cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. Nanoparticles in the gastrointestinal tract have been linked to Crohn’s disease and colon cancer. Nanoparticles that enter the circulatory system are implicated in arteriosclerosis, blood clots, arrhythmia, heart diseases, and ultimately death from heart disease. Nanoparticles entering other organs, such as liver, spleen, etc., may lead to diseases of these organs. Some nanoparticles are associated with autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, and rheumatoid arthritis.

An even more worrying study out of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) has shown that Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles cause systemic genetic damage. The TiO2 nanoparticles (used in cosmetics) induced single- and double-strand DNA breaks and also caused chromosomal damage as well as inflammation, all of which increase the risk for cancer. The UCLA study is the first to show that the nanoparticles had such an effect. Once in the system, the TiO2 nanoparticles accumulate in different organs because the body has no way to eliminate them. And because they are so small, they can go everywhere in the body, even through cells, and may interfere with sub-cellular mechanisms.

Knowing this, what woman would want Bill Gates sponsored nanofibers inside her body?

Conclusion

There is clearly an urgent need not only to stem but also to reverse the unregulated tide of nanoparticles that are released onto the market. In view of the existing evidence, the following actions should be taken.

· Engineered nano-ingredients in food, cosmetics and baby products for which toxicity data already exist (e.g., silver, titanium oxide, fullerenes, etc.) should be withdrawn immediately

· A moratorium should be imposed on the commercialization of nano-products until they are demonstrated safe

· All consumer products containing nanotechnology should be clearly labelled

Unfortunately, as is the case with these nanoparticles, and now the Gates funded electrospun fabric – the public will be the long-term study.

nanotechnology_diagram

Nanotechnology Diagram

Source: (1), (2), (3), (4)

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